Posts in Category
WebDev

As you are aware, when you create your post with images and publish them on your website, sooner or later they will appear on Google.

Your article will land in Search Results and images will be shown in Google Images.

Sometimes you are taking a lot of effort into your images and restricting their use by providing specific disclaimers or copyright information on your website.

The problem is that Google does not always know that and when you search for an image, that is sourced from your website, the image may be copyright restricted.

The user, who is searching through, will not know that as well and he may come into trouble. This may result in a fine that may need to be paid to the rightful owner.

When Google is releasing their search engine updates, there is always a lot of action and a lot of discussions around. Everybody is looking for the impact of the update on their website and position in search engines.

By the end of August 2022, Google comes with a Helpful Content Update (HCU). This highly appreciated (by content creators) update suppose to penalise low-content websites and those generated by AI. I have been happy about it and knew, that none of my websites will be affected, and I was right!

Read More about Where Helpful Content Update did not do as much, Core update did!
Implementing Structured Data (Schema) Carousel for Category pages in Hugo
Published
Read Time3 min.

On websites that I tend to create, I always try to utilise Structured Data (Schema) as much as possible. This invisible for ordinary visitor data is served in the background and is used by search engines and other websites for better positioning of your content.

On YummyRecipes.uk I have already widely implemented Schema for Recipes but would like to do some more.

Simple implementation of PWA on a website with a Mobile First Design approach
Published
Read Time9 min.

If you read my other post, you will find out that I recently rediscovered Progressive Web Apps (PWA).

Following this lead, I decided to implement it on the websites, where our main audience browses it from mobile phones. Later I decided to implement it gradually on all of my websites, independently of whether the main audience is on mobile or desktop. As you will see, PWA is quite useful for desktop users as well.

Simplified way of adding a favicon to the website
Published
Updated
Read Time4 min.

If you are not a first time on my website you already know, that I like simplifying things and using a minimal approach with a complex solution. Overall, if something complex can be done that same, but simple, why not try?

This time I want to cover Favicon during website design.

“A favicon is a browser icon that represents a brand or website. Most often seen next to a web page’s title in browser tabs, favicons can also be found in address bars, bookmark lists, search results pages, toolbars, browser history, and other places across the web.”

What is a favicon? @ blog.hubspot.com

I don’t want to reinvent the wheel, as there is already a perfect solution for that, well written and documented by Andrey Sitnik from Evil Martian.

Rediscovering Progressive Web Apps (PWA)
Published
Read Time3 min.

Over the last years, I forget about something called Progressive Web Apps (PWA) until one day I added to my Home Screen a bookmark to Homebridge, and, believe me, or not, I do not add bookmarks that way very often.

When I added this bookmark to my Home Screen on iOS I noticed, that it looks unusual. The icon was like a native app. When I click on the icon it didn’t open inside Safari like other bookmarks but it run on full screen like a normal native app.

Of course, it was still Safari in the background but highly limited to the scope of that single website, that it feels like a native. It certainly can be confused with an app.

Google Search Console hidden gem!
Published
Read Time3 min.

It’s not very often that I am finding something new in a tool that I am using constantly, every single day. Unless it’s announced as a new feature, I would not expect to find something, that is like a holy grail!

A "Read more" links are not bad for SEO (and a11y) if done right
Published
Read Time3 min.

From time to time I see and look at some SEO articles to see what others are writing about and what’s new that I need to look at.

I have started reading an article about some SEO mistakes to avoid, and the first thing that stopped me from reading further was a point about “Read more” links.

It was stated that the severity of using the “read more” link for SEO is high and that the developer of the site should remove the use of “read more” links in favour of article links (for example title as a link).

That particular author claimed that when that has been done, the site visibility “went through the roof”.

Partly I can agree with that, but removing “read more” links shall not be advised if it is done right. Here is why.

Removing outdated content from the website... not only for SEO
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Updated
Read Time5 min.

I have been reading for some time that one of your solutions for better SEO will be removing pages that are not performing well and just wasting a crawl time.

Redirecting them to the most relevant part (using redirect 301) or where such doesn’t exist, pointing back to the homepage and advising search engines that it’s gone (using redirect 410).

There is one problem with removing something from a page that you spend a lot of time creating. There is a sort of sentiment in it.

Even when I migrated from WordPress to Hugo I moved all pages to a new website. I have done an initial review and did some corrections, but never looked at the test from a merit point of view.

Generally, I am against using the rule of removing content that performs poorly in search engines. Not always the case, that the content is not desired. Sometimes simply is unique and targeting the niche that shall be here for some who will need it.

With such an approach, I am creating some of my posts. To give users something that I struggle to find. You can call it niche but in reality, this is something that some people are searching for and cannot find easily. If I struggle to find a solution and I will come up with my own, I would like to share this with the world.

A very Minimal Google Analytics 4 Snippet
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Read Time9 min.

Due to Google’s announcement that they will force us to move away from Universal Analytics to Google Analytics 4 I wasn’t happy with that. Due to a lack of alternatives in minimal analytics, loading official (bloated) tracking code that weights 171kB (in my instance), that is liable for blocking by various AdBlockers, wasn’t something that I had been looking forward to.

I started searching for a solution. Due to lack of it, I decided, by hit-and-miss approach, to create my own, and I think I did it. It weighs 2kB minified. Its main purpose is to track page views (page_view, session_start and first_visit) on our website in Google Analytics 4 property. Since version 1.06 it detects and tracks site searches (view_search_results), from 1.07 search query (search_term) and 1.09 scrolls (scroll) capturing scroll events each time when a visitor gets to the bottom of a page (90% and below).